A roadside stand summary & Question Answers Class 12 English Flamingo Ch-5 PDF

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A roadside stand summary & Question Answers Class 12 English Flamingo Ch-5 PDF

Class12th 
Chapter05
Chapter NameA roadside stand
BoardCBSE & All Others boards
Book NCERT
SubjectEnglish Elective  (Flamingo)
Medium English
Study Materialspoem Very important question to answer

A roadside stand summary | a roadside stand poem

Robert Frost (1874-1963) is a highly acclaimed American poet of the twentieth century, he was a well-known American poet, Robert Frost wrote of characters, people, and landscapes. 

His poems are concerned with human tragedies and fears, his reaction to the complexities of life, and his ultimate acceptance of his burdens. ‘Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening’ Birches’, and ‘Mending Walls’ are a few of his well-known poems.

In the poem ‘A Roadside Stand’. Robert Frost describes the miserable condition of poor rural people. The government and other social service agencies appear to help them but actually do them no good. 

The city folk who drive through the countryside hardly pay any heed to the roadside stand or to the people who run it. If at all they do, it is to complain. Frost presents the lives of poor deprived people with pitiless clarity and with the deepest sympathy and humanity.

A little house was extended further. A new shed was constructed. In front, at the edge of the road, stood a roadside stand. The movement of the traffic continued without any break. 

Very few people cared to stop there. Those who ran the stand didn’t raise it for a dole of bread. But they certainly expected that people would come there. They would buy something. Some cash would flow into their hands. Actually, they established the roadside stand for money.

The refined and rich people passed through the place with the intention of going ahead. No one stopped there. If any person cared to stop there he would get irritated. 

He would find the landscape spoiled by the clumsy paint with which the building was painted. He would find even the signs like ‘N’ and ‘S’ turned wrong.

The roadside stands offered ordinary things of daily use for sale. Wild berries were sold there in wooden quarts or units. Similarly, one could buy golden guards from the stand. 

The place also offered a peaceful stay in the lap of nature if one had money. The poet is worried about the untold sufferings and miseries that the people had to face and suffer.

The roadside stand is far away from the city. The people who run the stand, ask for some city money to feel in hand’. With this money, they want to progress and expand. 

They also want to lead that kind of life as promised by the moving pictures. But those promises remain distant dreams. The party in power, the government, is indifferent to the demands of the rural poor. 

There is news that these pitiable people and their belongings are to be bought out. They will be settled in villages where they ‘won’t have to think for themselves anymore’. The so-called ‘good doers’ or the greedy people w exploit them. 

These people who pretend to be generous are like wild flesh-eating animals. They are out to grab and swallow them. They will contr their lives earning huge profits for themselves. Their only job is to befool innocent rural people and mint money.

The poet feels the helplessness of those who are running the roadside stand. They are hoping against hope to earn money from their prospective customers. They keep their window open and wait all day for the customer. 

They want to hear the loud noise of brakes and the sound of a stopping car. Thousands of selfish car owners drive past. No one asks about the fate of the farmers or the price they are getting for their produce. Only some stop using the yard to back and turn around. 

Another may stop only to ask the way ‘where it was bound’. And another may ask if they sell a gallon of gas, which they have none of.

Money is required for all human progress. But in the countryside circulation of money is almost negligible. Without money and development, the rural poor remain depressed. They seem to complain about their step-motherly treatment and injustice. 

The poet feels an unbearable pain at the plight of the rural poor. He will feel greatly relieved if they are put out of their pain with one stroke. Death is far better than their miserable living.

a roadside stand summary in hindi | a roadside stand theme

एक छोटे से घर को और आगे बढ़ाया गया। एक नया छप्पर बनाया गया। सामने सड़ के किनारे एक सड़क के किनारे का अड्डा बनाया गया। यातायात बिना रुके चलता रहा। बहु ही कम लोग वहाँ रुकने की परवाह करते थे। जिन लोगों ने यह अड्डा (दुकान) खड़ा किय था उन्होंने दान की मुफ्त रोटियाँ प्राप्त करने के लिए ऐसा नहीं किया था। 

लेकिन निश्चित रू से वे आशा करते थे कि लोग वहाँ आयेंगे। वे कुछ खरीदेंगे। कुछ नगदी की उन्हें आमदनी होगी वास्तव में, उन्होंने पैसा कमाने के लिए वह अड्डे की दुकान की थी।

परिष्कृत और अमीर लोग और आगे बढ़ने के इरादे से उस जगह से गुजरते थे। वहाँ को नहीं रुकता था। यदि कोई वहाँ रुकने का कष्ट उठाता तो वह खिन्न हो जाता। वह भद्दे उ से किए गए पेंट से जिससे वह इमारत रंगी गयी थी भूदृष्य को खराब हुआ पाता। वह ‘N’ औ ‘S’ के निशान उलटे टंगे पाता।

सड़क किनारे के अड्डे की दुकान रोज की इस्तेमाल होने वाली साधारण चीजों की बिक्री की पेशकश करती। जंगली रासफल (बेरी) वहाँ के बने क्वार्टस (एक गेलन का चौथाई भाग में बिकती थी। इसी प्रकार सुनहरी काशीफल को भी अड्डे की दुकान से खरीदा ज सकता था। 

वह जगह प्रकृति की गोद में एक शांतिमय ठहरने की पेशकश भी करती थी, यदि किसी के पास धनराशि होती। कवि उन अनकहे कष्टों और दुखों से दुखी है जिन्हें उन लोगो को भुगतना और सामना करना पड़ा।

सड़क किनारे के अड्डे की दुकान शहर से काफी दूर है। जो लोग इसे चलाते हैं वह अपने हाथ में कुछ शहरी पैसा आने की इच्छा रखते हैं। इस पैसे से वे तरक्की करना व फैलाना चाहते हैं। वे उस प्रकार का जीवन बिताना चाहते हैं जिसका चलायमान तस्वीरों में वायदा किया जाता है। लेकिन वे वायदे दूर के सपने बने हुए हैं। जो पार्टी सत्ता में है, अर्थात् सरकार इन देहाती गरीबों की माँग के प्रति उदासीन रही है।

एक खबर कि ये दयनीय लोग और उनकी चीजों को खरीद लिया जायेगा। उन्हें गाँवों में बसा दिया जायेगा जहाँ उन्हें अपने बारे में और अधिक सोचने की जरूरत नहीं पड़ेगी’। तथाकथित ‘भला करने वाले’ या लालची लोग उनका शोषण करेंगे। 

ये लोग जो दयालु होने का लांग रखते हैं ये माँस खाने वाले जंगली जानवरों जैसे हैं। वे उनकों झपटने और निगलने के लिए तैयार हैं। वे उनके जीवन को नियंत्रित करेंगे और अपने लिए काफी फायदा कमायेंगे। उनका केवल एक ही काम है निर्दोष गाँव वाले लोगों को बेवकूफ बनाना और पैसा कमाना।

कवि उन लोगों की असहायता का अनुभव करता है जो इस सड़क के साथ वाली अड्डे की दुकान चला रहे हैं। अपने सम्भावित ग्राहकों से पैसा कमाने की इच्छा कर वे आशा के विरुद्ध आशा कर रहे हैं। वे अपनी खिड़की खुली रखते हैं और सारा दिन ग्राहकों का इंतजार करते हैं। वे ब्रेक लगने की जोर की आवाज, और एक कार के रुकने की आवाज को सुनना चाहते हैं। 

हजारों स्वार्थी कार मालिक वहाँ से गुजर जाते हैं। कोई भी किसानों के भाग्य के बारे में या अपनी उपज का वे क्या मूल्य ले रहे हैं नहीं पूछता है। केवल कुछ रुकते हैं जो उस आंगन का प्रयोग कार को पीछे लगाने और मोड़ने के लिए करते हैं। दूसरा कोई सिर्फ रास्ते पूछने के लिए रुकेगा कि वह कहाँ जाता है। और फिर कोई दूसरा यह पूछेगा कि क्या वे एक गैलन गैस देचते हैं जो उनके पास बिल्कुल नहीं है।

हर मानव विकास के लिए पैसे की जरूरत रहती है। लेकिन देहात में पैसे का प्रचलन लगभग नगण्य है। बिना पैसे और विकास के देहाती गरीब उदास रहते हैं। वे अपने साथ हुए सोतेले व्यवहार और अन्याय की शिकायत करते प्रतीत होते हैं। 

कवि इन देहाती गरीब लोगों की दुर्दशा पर न सह सकने वाले दुख को अनुभव करता है। वह बहुत चैन अनुभव करेगा यदि एक ही चार से उन्हें उनके दुखों से बाहर निकाला जा सके उनके दुखदायी जीवन से मृत्यु कहीं भली है।

class 12th NotesMCQ
HistoryPolitical Science
EnglishHindi

a roadside stand word meaning 

  • Out—(here) extended outside, बाहर की ओर बढ़ा दिया गया। Shed a simple building for storing things, छप्पर; Edge-border किनारा; Traffic sped-fast movement of vehicles, गाड़ियों का तेज यातायात; 
  • Roadside by the side of the road, सड़क के किनारे वाला; Stand-a place at which people can buy things or obtain information, अड्डा; Pathetically in a pitiable manner, दयनीय रूप से; Pled-made a request, निवेदन करता था, चिरौरी करता था; 
  • Not be fair-it would not be just, यह कहना उचित नहीं होगा। Dole of bread – (here) donations, खैरात; Cash- money in hand, नगदी Supports-holds up, keeps from falling, थामे रखना, सहारा देना, 
  • The flower of cities-best things of the city, शहर की सबसे बढ़िया चीजें; Sinking-(here) ruin, बर्बादी; Withering-drying and shrinking कुम्हलाते हुए; Faint- lifeless, अशक्त; Polished-refined, परिष्कृत; Traffic-movement of vehicles, यातायात; 
  • Mind ahead (here) going straight forward, सीथा आगे बढ़ना; If ever- if at any time, यदि कभी हुआ तो; Aside-on one side, एम तरफ, किनारे, Out of sorts-(here) irritated, not feeling well, खिन्न होते हुए। Landscape-sight of the land, भूदृश्य; 
  • Marred-spoiled, खराब किया हुआ; Artless-clumsy, भद्दा । Offered presented, प्रस्तुत करता था; Wild – (here) of the forest, जंगली; Berries-(here) a small round fruit growing on wild bush,; Wooden-made of wood, लक्कड़ के बने; Quarts-a measuring unit of quarter of gallon, मापने की इकाई, एक
  • far as her free; Crook-necked-bent necked, get fit Squash- gourd, like pumpkin, gur chat ret eft; Silver warts-hard lumps, चाँदी जैसी कोलके, Mean- (here) miser, कंजूस, 
  • Go along-move forward, आगे बढ़ना Hart-harm, Scenery-(here) landscape, Expand-(here) dilate, far; Pitiful-merciful, g; kin-relatives, H; Mercifully- having mercy, gt Gathered-assembled, et & Greedy good doers greedy persons who pretend to do good, लालची आदमी जो अच्छाई करने का Beneficent-generous; Beasts of prey-violent mo eating animals like lions, etc.,
  • Swarm-assemble in large numbers, काफी संख्या में मंडराना; Enforcing-doing by force, जबर्दस्ती करते हुए; Benefits- profits, पापदे, साथ, Calculated-planned before, पहले से ही तथ, योजना बच A; Soothe-to make silent, Out of their wits-to make fools, Ancient-old, yum; Hardly-with difficulty, fear; Bear-tolerated. सहन करना; Childish-(here) immature, अपरिपक्व; 
  • Longing-strong desire, प्रबल इच्छा; In vain—without any use, व्यर्थ, Lurks-lies hidden, छुपी पड़ी है; Squeal- cries, ; Salfish cars-selfish car owners,art; Inquire-to get information, पत लगाना, पूछताछ करना; Plow up-turn over, उलटना; Yard-open space, 3FT; Bound-leading to, T; Scale-level, 4; Gain–(here) progress, विकास; 

a roadside stand stanza wise explanation | A roadside stand question answer

Read the stanzas given below and answer the questions that follow each: 

Stanza 1

The little old house was out with a little new shed In front at the edge of the road where the traffic sped, A roadside stands that too pathetically pled, It would not be fair to say for a dole of bread, But for some of the money, the cash, whose flow supports The flower of cities from sinking and withering faint. 

Answer the following questions: 

(a) Where was the stand located? How was it made?

Ans. The roadside stand was located on one side of the road. A little old house was extended and a new shed was constructed in front to open it. 

(b) Explain: ‘too pathetically pleased’.

Ans. It pleaded/begged in the most humble 

(c) What would not be fair to say? way.

Ans. It would not be fair to say that the stand was set up for a dole of bread.

(d) What was the real aim of running this roadside shed? 

Ans. The real aim of running the shed was to earn some money from the city people who passed from there. 

(e) How is money important for city life?

Ans. The flow of money saves all the best: and most beautiful things in the cities from ruin and within.ag away. 

(F) Find words from the stanza which mean:

(i) corner (ii) money given to the unemployed (iii) becoming dry and faded.

Ans. (i) edge (ii) dole (iii) withering.

Stanza 2

The polished traffic passed with a mind ahead, Or if ever aside a moment, then out of sorts At having the landscape marred with the artless paint Of signs that with N turned wrong and S turned wrong Offered for sale wild berries in wooden quarts, Or crook-necked golden squash with silver warts,

Answer the following questions:

(a) How did the traffic pass?

Ans. The traffic passed by the roadside stand without stopping there. The vehicles drove past ahead. 

(b) Why was a person turned ‘out of sorts’?

Ans. The building was painted clumsily. The sight of this building with the artless paint spoilt the landscape. It irritated a person who stopped there. 

(c) What was the state of the signs with ‘N’ and ‘S’?

Ans. The signs with the letters ‘N’ and ‘S’ were turned wrong.

(d) What were the two things that were sold at the roadside stand? 

Ans. Wild berries and golden squash were the two things that were sold at the roadside stand. 

(e) Find words from, the stanza which mean:

(i) refined (iii) spoiled

(ii) movement of vehicles (iv) clumsy

Ans. (i) polished (ii) traffic (iii) marred (iv) artless.

Stanza 3.

Or beauty rest in a beautiful mountain scene, You have the money, but if you want to be mean, Why keep your money (this crossly) and go along? The hurt to the scenery wouldn’t be my complaint So much as the trusting sorrow of what is unsaid:

Answer the following questions:

(a) Name the poem and the poet of these lines.

Ans. The poem is ‘A Roadside Stand’. The poet is Robert Frost. 

(b) What attraction does the place offer? 

Ans. The place offers a beautiful mountain scene for staying there if one has money.

(c) What should one do if one wants to be mean?

Ans. One should keep one’s money and move ahead. 

(d) What does the poet not complain about?

Ans. The poet does not complain that the landscape has been spoiled by the artless paint done on the building. 

(e) What do you think is the real worry of the poet?

Ans. The real worry of the poet is about the sorrows of these people which have not been expressed so far.” 

(F) Find words from the stanza which mean :

(i) miser (ii) harm (iii) believing.

Ans. (i) mean (ii) hurt (iii) trusting.

Stanza 4

Here far from the city, we make our roadside stand And ask for some city money to feel in hand To try if it will not make our being expand, And give us the life of the moving pictures promise That the party in power is said to be keeping from us.

Answer the following questions:

(a) Who are ‘we’ in the first line? Where have they made the roadside 

Ans. “We’ stands for the rural poor who run the roadside stand.  made the roadside stand far from the city.

(b) Why do they ask for some city money??

Ans. They ask for city money to keep their business going and develop it.

(c) How would city money change their lifestyle? 

Ans. The money earned from city people will make these rural poor prosperous. It will give them the life as promised by the moving pictures.

(d) What is the party in power doing to the rural poor? 

Ans. The party in power has not cared for the rural poor. It has not fulfilled the promises made to them.

(e) Find words and phrases from the stanza that mean:

(i) to come to hand (ii) stretch/develop (iii) not doing. 

Ans. (i) to feel in the hand (ii) expand (Hi) keeping from.

Stanza 5

It is in the news that all these pitiful kin Are to be bought out and mercifully gathered in To live in villages, next to the theatre and the store, Where they won’t have to think for themselves anymore,

Answer the following questions: 

(a) Who are ‘all these pitiful kin’? What is in the news? 

Ans. All these pitiful kin’ refers to the rural people whose condition is pitiable. There is news that these pitiable persons are to be bought out with their belongings.

(b) Where will they be settled? 

Ans. They will be made to live together. They will be settled in the villages next to the theatre and the store. 

(c) Why won’t they have to think for themselves anymore?

Ans. Now they are in the grip of selfish and cunning people. They will pose to do good things, but actually, they will exploit them. These greedy good-doers will control their lives. Hence, they won’t have to think for themselves.

(d) Find words from the stanza that mean: (i) relatives (ii) having mercy (iii) assembled.

Ans. (i) kin (ii) mercifully (iii) gathered. While greedy good-doers, beneficent beasts of prey, Swarm over their lives enforcing benefits

Stanza 6.

That is calculated to soothe them out of their wits, And by teaching them how to sleep they sleep all day, Destroying their sleeping at night the ancient way.

Answer the following questions:

(a) Name the poem and the poet of these lines. 

Ans. The poem is ‘A Roadside Stand’. The poet is Robert Frost.

(b) Explain (i) greedy good-doers and (ii) beneficent beasts of prey. 

Ans. (i) Greedy people pretending to be doing good things. (ii) People who are cruel like the flesh-eating wild animals pretending to be generous.

(c) Who will be soothed ‘out of their wits’? How? 

Ans. Innocent rural people will be befooled. The cunning and greedy people will force them to part with their money. They will exploit the rural poor and mint money.

(d) What will they pretend to do? What will ‘they’ actually do? 

Ans. They will pretend to teach the rural people how to sleep, relax and rest. Actually, they will make them work but they themselves will sleep all day.

(e) Who will destroy ‘their’ sleeping at night and how? 

Ans. The ‘greedy good-doers and ‘beneficent beasts of prey will use their old tricks to destroy their peace and sleep.

(f) Find words and phrases from the stanza which mean:

(i) generous (iii) profits

(iv) old.

(ii) flesh-eating big wild animals

Ans. (i) beneficent (ii) beasts of prey (iii) benefits (iv) Sometimes I feel myself I can hardly bear

Stanza 7.

The thought of so much childish longing in vain, The sadness that lurks near the open window there,

That waits all day in almost open prayer For the squeal of brakes, the sound of a stopping car,

Answer the following questions: 

(a) Who is T in this stanza? What does the speaker feel sometimes? 

Ans. T here stands for the poet, Robert Frost. Sometimes, the poet feels that he can hardly bear the thought of so much useless childish 

(b) What is ‘childish longing?

Ans. Waiting for prospective customers that will never turn up is a childish longing. 

(c) Why does sadness lurk near the open window there? 

Ans. A lurking sadness prevails near the open window when no customer turns up. 

(d) What do the people at the roadside stand to wait for and why?

Ans. They go on waiting throughout the day for the sound of brakes, and the sound of a stopping car. They expect some customers if the car stops there. 

(e) Find words from the stanza which mean:

(i) tolerate (ii) strong desire (iii) lies hidden (iv) cries. 

Ans. (i) bear (ii) longing (iii) lurks (iv) squeal. Of all the thousand selfish cars that pass,

Stanza 8.

Just one to inquire what a farmer’s prices are. And one did stop, right only to plow up. grass In using the yard to back and turn around; And another to ask the way to where it was bound; 

And another to ask could they sell it a gallon of gas They couldn’t (this crossly); they had none, didn’t it see?

Answer the following questions:

(a) Why are cars called selfish

Ans. The cars are called ‘selfish’ because the car owners think only of themselves, their journey, and their self-interest. 

(b) What do car owners generally do? rural poor.

Ans. They do not bother about enquiring into the fate of the For example, no one enquires what a farmer’s prices are.

(c) Why do people generally stop there?

Ans. People generally stop there to use the yard to turn their cars around. Some stop to ask the way to where it is bound. Yet others may ask for a gallon of gas that is not sold there.

(d) Find words/phrases from the stanza which mean:

(i) to get information (ii) to turnover (iii) leading to. 

Ans. (1) inquire (i) to plow up (iii) bound.

Stanza 9.

No, in-country money, the country scale of gain, The requisite lift of spirit has never been found, Or so the voice of the country seems to complain, I can’t help owning the great relief it would be to put these people at one stroke out of their pain. 

And then the next day as I come back into the same, I wonder how I should like you to come to me And offer to put me gently out of my pain.

Answer the following questions: 

(a)Why has the “requisite lift of spirit” never been found?

Ans. The life of the people in the countryside is quite miserable for want of money. Money which can increase the level of their living is not found there. Hence the spirit of the rural people remains depressed because of poverty.

(b) What does the voice of the country seem to say? 

Ans. The voice of the country’s people seems to complain of injustice against them and lack of money in their lives.

(c) How will the poet feel a great relief? 

Ans. The poet will feel great relief if the rural people are liberated of all pains with one stroke.

(d) What will the poet like the next day? 

Ans. The next day the poet will expect another person to come to him and offer to put him gently out of pain.

(e) Find words from the stanza which mean: (i) desired (ii) accepting (iii) comfort.

Ans. (i) requisite (ii) owning (Hi) relief.

a roadside stand question answer


Very short answer type questions

Class 12 English A Thing of Beauty summary
Class 12 English

1. The city folk who drove through the countryside hardly paid any heed to the roadside stand or the people who ran it. If at all they did, it was to complain. Which lines bring this out? What was their complaint about? 

Ans. The city folk who drove through the countryside hardly paid any heed to the roadside stand. If at all they did, it was only to complain. The following lines bring this out.

(i) Then out of sorts. At having the landscape marred with the artless paint.

(ii) ‘Of signs that N turned wrong and S turned wrong.” Their complaint was that the artless and clumsy paint painted on the roadside stand spoiled the whole landscape. They were also irritated that even signs like N and S were turned wrong. 

2. What was the plea of the folk who had put up the roadside stand? 

Ans. The men who had put up the roadside stand pleaded pathetically for some customers who came and they wanted to earn money from them. They wanted the city folk passing through the countryside to stop there to buy something from them. It was the intention with which the roadside stand was set up.

3. The government and other social service agencies appear to help the poor rural people but actually do them no good. Pick out the words and phrases that the poet uses to show their double standards.

Ans. The government and the party in power were quite indifferent to the welfare of the poor rural people. Nor were other social service agencies doing any good to them. The words and phrases used to show their double standards are:

“While greedy good-doers, beneficent beasts of prey, Swarm over their lives enforcing benefits. That is calculated to soothe them out of their wits.” 

4. What is the ‘childish longing’ that the poet refers to? Why is it “vain’?

Ans. The poet thinks that the people who are running the roadside stand suffer from a childish longing. They are always waiting for their prospective customers. They keep their windows open to attract them. But when no one turns up they become sad. They are always waiting to hear the squeal of brakes, the sound of a stopping car. But everything goes in vain.

5. Which lines tell us about the insufferable pain that the poet feels at the thought of the plight of the rural poor?

Ans. The poet feels that all the pains from which the poor rural people suffer must be removed in one stroke. The following two lines express these feelings: “I can’t help owning the great relief it would be To put these one stroke out of their pain. people at

SHORT ANSWER TYPE QUESTIONS

Class 12 English A roadside stand summary
Class 12 English Question Answer

1. Who will soothe the rural poor out of their wits and how? 

Ans. The greedy people posing as ‘good-doers’ will swarm over their lives. They will be planning to extract maximum profits from them. There are people who are crueler than the beasts of prey. Their only aim is to mint money and earn profits by befooling innocent rural people. They will sleep all day destroying their sleep at night.

2. What does the poet sometimes feel a ‘childish longing in vain’ and how? 

Ans. The poet feels that the people who are running the roadside stand are always pathetically soliciting customers. It is a futile exercise. In spite of keeping the windows open and waiting for such a long time, very few customers turn up. Hence, it is nothing more than a vain ‘childish longing’ on his part.

3. What do the squeal of brakes and the sound of a stopping car mean for the people who are running the roadside stand? 

Ans. The people who are running the roadside stand are always waiting for the city folk to stop there to buy something. So the squealing brakes and the sound of a stopping car are auspicious signs for them. They raise the hope of some city folk coming and stopping there.

4. Where and why were the roadside stands set up?

Ans. An old house was extended out with a little new shed. In the front, at one side of the road, a roadside stand was set up. It was on a busy road. The city folk driving through the countryside passed in front of it. The people who are running it set up the roadside stand to attract the city folk as customers. They expected some money to pass. 

5. What did the roadside stand plead too pathetically? Did it get it?

Ans. The people who were running the roadside stand expected some of the traffic to stop there. They looked forward to their prospective customers earning some money. But very few obliged them. Hence, they didn’t get the money that they had expected to earn from their customers.

6. Describe the value of ‘money’ and ‘cash’ for ‘the flower of cities’. 

Ans. Money makes the world go. The men who were running the roadside stand hoped to get some of the money or the cash that flowed into cities. The flow of money and cash supports all the developments in the city. It supports the best things in cities from sinking and being destroyed.

7. Did ‘the polished traffic’ stop at the roadside stand and if at all they stopped, what were their reactions? 

Ans. Generally ‘the polished traffic’ of the rich and the refined didn’t stop at the roadside stand. They passed with a mind to go ahead. If at all, some were not impressed with the place. They complained of the clumsy paint of the building. They were irritated at the sight of signs ‘N’ 2 ‘S’ turned wrong. 

8. Why do the people who are running the roadside stand ask for some city money?? 

Ans. The countryside is not cash-rich. The people who run the roadside and stand wish that the cash-rich city people may patronize and oblige them. That money can also bring some changes and prosperity in their lives. Only some city money can change their lives. 

9. What is the news running around?

Ans. It is in the news that all these ‘pitiful kin’ are to be bought out. They will be settled in villages. Their places will be taken over by rich and cunning people. They won’t have to ‘think for themselves anymore’. The greedy and cruel exploiters will ‘swarm over their lives’.

10. ‘Of all the thousand selfish cars’ some stop there but do not for buying something. Why do they stop there at all?

Ans. Out of all the thousand selfish cars,’ only some of them stop there. But their purpose is different. Some stop only to use the yard to back and turn around the car. The other stops to ask the way to where it is bound. The third one asks if they can sell a gallon of gas. So they stop here only to serve themselves. 

11. What will be a great relief to the poet? How can the problems of the rural poor be solved? 

Ans. The poet is much worried about the plight of the rural poor. He can’t help accepting that it will be a great relief to him if these people are put out of their pains at one stroke. Their miserable living is no way better than death. The poet wants an immediate end to the suffering of the rural poor.




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FAQs

Q. Name some of the things that the roadside stand offered for sale. 

Ans. The roadside stands offered some of the ordinary things of daily use for sale. They included wild berries. They were sold in wooden quarts, a quarter of a gallon. Crook-necked gourds with silvery hard lumps were also offered for sale at the roadside stand. 

Q. The hurt to the scenery wouldn’t be my complaint’ says the poet What was his real complaint? 

Ans. The poet didn’t bother with the clumsy paint that marred the landscape. It was not his complaint. His real worry was about those unsaid sorrows and sufferings that the rural poor faced or suffered from. Their pitiable condition moved his heart.

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