Journey to the end of the Earth Important Questions Class 12 English summary, Solutions & PDF

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If are you a student of class 12th and you are looking for important notes on the subject of English (Journey to the end of the Earth Important Questions Class 12) then this website is for you.

This website tells you the question and answers which are very important for the exam and for the last few years it gives you the same questions, by reading these questions you can get very good marks in your exam.

I myself have been a topper of class 12th and I know what type of questions are asked in class 12th exam. At present, I am also playing the role of a teacher, and also make my students practice important information and topics of class 12th. I have written the MCQs article here with my experience of more than 5 years. With the help of this post, you will be able to get very good marks in history from this chapter in the exam.

Journey to the End of the Earth Important Questions Class 12 English summary, Solutions & PDF

Class12th 
Chapter03
Chapter NameJourney to the end of the Earth
AuthorTishani Doshi
BoardCBSE & All Others boards
Book NCERT
SubjectEnglish Elective  (Flamingo)
Medium English
Study MaterialsSupplementary Reader Very important question to answer

Journey to the End of the Earth summary | Journey to the end of the earth

In Journey to the end of the earth’. Tishani Doshi describes the journey in de Colere driest and windiest continent in the world. 

Antarctica in this season Tishani Doshi narrate that today we are much worried about the worsening condition of our ecology and environment. It is believed that man is responsible for global warming which is causing climatic changes. 

We hear A ice caps are melting and glaciers are receding. But we seldom realise the real impact of the rise in temperature. A visit to Antarctica makes it visibly dear. There one can see ice shelves collapsing.

‘Students on Ice’ is a programme headed by Canadian Geoff Green. Its aim is to provide young students with an opportunity to see and understand the impact of global warming. 

They are the future policy-makers. If they understand this, they will act to prevent the catastrophe that awaits our planet.

The narrator boarded a Russian research ship-The ‘Akademik Shokalskiy’. It was heading towards the coldest, driest and windiest continent in the

world: Antarctica. His journey began 13.09 degrees north of the Equator in Madras (Chennai). He crossed nine time zones, six checkpoints, three bodies

of water and at least three ecospheres. He travelled over 100 hours by car, aeroplane and ship to reach there. Six hundred and fifty million years ago a giant southern supercontinent Gondwana did exist. 

It centred roughly around present-day Antarctica. Human beings hadn’t arrived on the global scene. It had a huge variety of flora and fauna. After 500 million years, the landmass was forced to separate into countries as they exist today.

The purpose of the visit was to know more about Antarctica; ozone and carbon; evolution and extinction. Ninety per cent of the earth’s total ice volumes are stored in Antarctica. There are no human settlements, no trees and no buildings. Icebergs are as big as countries. 

Days go on and on in 24-hour Austral summer light. The most hotly contested debate of our time is whether the West Antarctic Ice sheet will melt entirely or not. If we want to study the Earth’s past, present and future, Antarctica is the place to go. Antarctica has a simple ecosystem and lacks biodiversity. 

It is the perfect place to study how little changes in the environment can have big repercussions. Scientists warn that a further depletion of the ozone layer will affect the lives of the sea animals and birds of the

region. It will also affect the global carbon cycle. It was the most thrilling experience of the visit. They climbed down the gangplank and walked on the ocean. There were 52 people. 

They were walking on a metre-thick ice pack. Under the ice pack, there were 180 metres of living. breathing, salt water. Seals were enjoying themselves in the sun on ice. The narrator was wondering about the beauty of the place. He wished it would not become a warm place as it used to be millions of years ago. If it happens, the results can be ruinous.

journey to the end of the earth summary in hindi | Journey to the end of the earth class 12 

कथाकार रूसी-शोथ-पोत अकादमिक शोकल्सकिए किए पर सवार हुआ। वह संसार के सबसे ठण्डे, शुष्क और हवादार महाद्वीप अन्टार्कटिका की ओर अग्रसर हो रहा था। उसकी यात्रा भूमध्य रेखा के 13.09 डिग्री उत्तर मद्रास (चेन्नई) से शुरू हुई। उसने 9 समय क्षेत्र, 6 चैकपाईंट, तीन पानी के क्षेत्र और कम से कम तीन पारिस्थिकी क्षेत्रों को पार किया। वह कार, हवाईजहाज और समुद्री जहाज़ से 100 घन्टे की यात्रा करने के बाद वहाँ पहुँचा।

650 मिलियन साल पहले एक विशाल दक्षिणी उच्च महाद्वीप गोण्डवाना मौजूद था। आज के अन्टार्कटिका के लगभग पास में इसका केन्द्र था। अभी मनुष्यों का ग्लोबल पटल पर आगमन नहीं हुआ था। इस पर वनस्पति और जीवों की विशाल विविधता थी। 500 मिलियन सालों के बाद इस भूमिखंड को अलग-अलग देशों में विभक्त होना पड़ा जैसे कि वे आजकल हैं।

इस यात्रा का उद्देश्य अन्टार्कटिका, ओजोन और कार्बन; क्रम विकास और विनाश के बारे में और अधिक जानना था। संसार के तमाम बर्फ के आयतन का 90% भाग अन्टार्कटिका में है। कोई इन्सानों की बस्तियाँ नहीं हैं, कोई पेड़ नहीं है और कोई भी भवन नहीं हैं। हिमखंड देशों जितने बड़े हैं। दिन 24 घंटे ग्रीष्म प्रकाश में चलते रहते हैं।

हमारे समय की सबसे गर्मागर्म बहस है कि क्या पश्चिमी अन्टार्कटिका में बर्फ की चादर पूर्ण रूप से पिघलेगी या नहीं। यदि हम पृथ्वी के भूत, वर्तमान और भविष्य का अध्ययन करना चाहते हैं तो अन्टार्कटिका ही हमारे जाने की (उपयुक्त) जगह है। अन्टार्कटिका की एक सरल पारिस्थितकी प्रणाली है और उसमें जैव-विविधता की कमी है। 

किस प्रकार पर्यावरण में हुए छोटे-छोटे परिवर्तनों के बड़े बुरे परिणाम हो सकते हैं इसके अध्ययन के लिए यह सबसे उपयुक्त स्थान है। वैज्ञानिक यह चेतावनी देते हैं कि ओजोन की परत का और घटना इस क्षेत्र के समुद्री’ पशुओं और पक्षियों के जीवन को प्रभावित करेगा। वह भूमण्डलीय कार्बन चक्र को भी प्रभावित करेगा।

यह यात्रा का सबसे उत्साहपूर्ण अनुभव था। वे लकड़ी के पुल से नीचे आये और सागर पर चले। वे 52 व्यक्ति थे। वे एक मीटर मोटी परत पर चल रहे थे। बर्फ की परत के 180 मीटर नीचे जीवित, सांस लेता नमकीन पानी है। बर्फ पर बैठी सील मछलियाँ धूप का आनन्द ले रही थीं। कथाकार जगह की सुन्दरता पर हैरानी अनुभव कर रहा था। वह कामना करता है कि वह जैसा कि लाखों वर्षों पहले हुआ करता था उतना गर्म नहीं होगा। यदि ऐसा होता है, तो परिणाम घातक हो सकते हैं।

class 12th NotesMCQ
HistoryPolitical Science
EnglishHindi

 WORD-MEANINGS

  • Aboard-on a ship, जहाज पर सवार; vessel – ship, जहाज; continent-on of the large landmasses of earth, 481; equator-great circle of earth dividing it into north and south hemispheres, भूमध्य रेखा, विषुवत रेखा; ecospheres part of the earth where life can exist, जैव मण्डल। 
  • emotion-feeling, भावना; expansive- stretching out, विस्तार; uninterrupted continuous, अविरल; horizon-apparent line dividing the earth and sky, क्षितिज; profound-deep, गहरा; immensity- vastness, अनन्तता; isolation-separation, अलगाव; landmass-large tract of land, भूषिण्ड। amalgamated blended, एकीकृत present day-now, वर्तमान
  •  global- worldwide, विश्व का hosting sheltering, आश्रय देती हुई, variety kinds, प्रकार, flora and fauna-vegetation and animals, वनस्पति व जीवजन्तुः thrived-pros
  • जहाज से नीचे उतरने का पुल; kitted out-provided with necessary clothes e आवश्यक कपड़े आदि पहनाए; glares dazzling light, चकाचौंध; stark-devoid of any elaboration, ; ice pack-packed ice, de 4, periphery-outer boundary, परिधि;
  •  floes-sheets of ice floating in the sea, बर्फ की तैरती चादरें revelation-disclosure of a secret, are wondering-amazing, 78; idealism-tendency to seek perfection, anafa etc.,

journey to the end of the Earth question answers  | Journey to the end of the Earth question answer


Very short answer type questions

Class 12 English Journey to the End of the Earth Important Questions
Class 12 English

1. How do geological phenomena help us to know about the history of humankind?

Ans. Geological phenomena certainly help us to know about the history of humankind. We come to know that a giant southern supercontinent Gondwana did exist six hundred and fifty million years ago. The climate was much warmer and it had a huge variety of flora and fauna. 

Gondwana thrived for 500 million years. Finally, it broke to separate countries as they exist today. It was the stage when dinosaurs were wiped out and the age of mammals started.

2. What are the indications for the future of humankind?

Ans. Rapid human population growth and limited resources exert pressure on land. The burning of fossil fuels has only helped in increasing the average global temperature. 

Melting of ice-caps in the Antarctic region, depletion of the ozone layer and the threat of global warming are the dangers mankind is going to face in the near future. They will affect the lives of all the marine animals and the birds of the region.

3. The world’s geological history is trapped in Antarctica. How is the study of this region useful to us?

Ans. Present-day Antarctica was the centre of a huge landmass called Gondwana. It was a giant southern supercontinent. It existed about 650 million years ago and thrived for 500 million years. 

Then it was not cold. The climate was warm. Thousands of species of fauna and flora lived there. But there were no human beings. 

Then this landmass disintegrated. India broke away and pushed against Asia, and created the Himalayas. South America drifted away to join North America. 

Indeed Antarctica holds the key to the geological history of our world. It helps to understand the significance of Cordilleran folds and pre-Cambrian granite shields, ozone and carbon, evolution and extinction. 

4. What are Geoff Green’s reasons for including high school students in the Students on Ice expedition?

Ans. Students on Ice’ aims at taking high school students to the ends of the world. It provides them with inspiring educational opportunities to know more about the Antarctic region. Its idea is to foster a new understanding and respect for our planet. 

It is headed by a Canadian named Geoff Green. Green is tired of catering to celebrities and rich people. “Students on Ice’ offers a life-changing experience to young learners. 

They are ready to absorb, learn and act. The programme has been quite successful. They can see with their own eyes glaciers retreating and ice shelves collapsing. They can realise that the threat of global warming is real.

Antarctica provides young students with a perfect place to study changes in the environment. These little changes can have big repercussions. 

They can see those grasses of the sea that nourish and sustain the entire Southern Ocean’s food chain. All these things make Geoff Green’s ‘Students on Ice’ expedition quite an interesting and instructive experience.

5. Take care of the small things and the big things will take care of themselves. What is the relevance of this statement in the context of the Antarctic environment? 

Ans. Take care of the small things and the big things will take care of themselves. This is a great metaphor for existence. Antarctica has quite a simple ecosystem. It lacks biodiversity. It is the perfect place to study how little changes in the environment can have big repercussions. 

The study of very small phytoplankton is quite interesting. They are the grasses of the sea. They nourish and sustain the entire Southern Ocean’s food chain. These single-celled plants use the sun’s energy. They assimilate carbon. 

They synthesise organic compounds. This process is called photosynthesis. Scientists warn that a further depletion of the ozone layer will affect the activities of the phytoplankton. Holes in the ozone layer will affect the lives of all the sea animals and birds of the region. Actually, it will affect the global carbon cycle. 

There is great relevance to this statement in the context of the Antarctic environment. These small things have to be taken care of. If they are taken care of, big things will fall into place. But if global warming is not arrested, it will lead to serious consequences. Similarly, the further depletion of the ozone layer can bring big disastrous climatic changes in the environment.

4. Why is Antarctica the place to go to, to understand the earth’s present, past and future?

Ans. To visit Antarctica is to be a part of the earth’s past history. We came to know that about 650 million years ago there was a giant supercontinent in the south. It was called Gondwana. India and Antarctica were parts of the same landmass Gondwana. 

Things were quite different then. Humans hadn’t arrived on the earth. The climate of Antarctica was much warmer. It had a huge variety of flora and fauna. Dinosaurs became extinct. The age of mammals has started. The landmass was forced to be separated into countries as they exist today.

The study of Antarctica can also help to understand the earth’s present and future as well. About 90 per cent of the earth’s total volume is stored in Antarctica. 

There are no trees, buildings and human settlements in Antarctica. We lose all earthly sense of perspective and time here. The visual scale ranges from microscopic midges and mites to the mighty blue whales. 

Antarctica also provides a warning for the future. What will happen if global warming results in the constant melting of icebergs? It will bring disastrous results. The further depletion of the ozone layer will affect sea animals, vegetation and humans very adversely in future.

SHORT ANSWER TYPE QUESTIONS

Class 12 English Journey to the end of the Earth Important Questions
Class 12 English Question Answer

1. What was the purpose of the visit to Antarctica? 

Ans. The purpose of the visit was to have first-hand knowledge and experience of the coldest, driest and windiest continent in the world. It was to understand the significance of Cordilleran folds; Ozone and Carbon; evolution and extinction.

The aim was to see glaciers retreating and ice shelves collapsing. It was to realise how real was the threat of global warming and depletion of the ozone layer. perspective and time in

2. How does one lose all earthly sense of Antarctica?

Ans. The world of Antarctica is unique. It is much different than the other parts of the globe. It is a place where 90 per cent of the earth’s total ice volume is stored. It is devoid of any human markers. There are no trees, no billboards and no buildings. 

We lose all earthly sense of perspective and time here. The visual scale range is very vast-from the microscopic to the mighty. Days go on and on in 24-hour Austral summer light. 

3. How did the author reach Antarctica?

Ans. The narrator boarded a Russian research ship-‘the Akademik Shokalskiy’. He was heading towards Antarctica-the coldest, driest and windiest continent in the world. 

His journey began 13.09 degrees north of the Equator in Madras (Chennai). He had to cross nine time zones, six checkpoints, three bodies of water and at least three ecospheres. He travelled over 100 hours in a combination of car, aeroplane and ship. 

4. Why is Antarctica the perfect place to study changes in the environment?

Ans. Antarctica is the perfect place to study changes in the environment. These little changes can have big climatic repercussions. It has a very simple ecosystem. It lacks biodiversity. For example, the study of microscopic phytoplanktons. 

They are the grasses of the sea. They nourish and sustain the entire Southern Ocean’s food chain. Scientists warn that a further depletion of the ozone layer will affect the lives of all sea animals and birds of the region and the global carbon cycle.

5. Describe the walking experience on the ocean in the Antarctic Circle.

Ans. The Russian research ship managed to place itself into a thick stretch of ice. It was between the peninsula and Tadpole Island. They were instructed to climb down the gangplank and walk on the ocean. 

All 52 of them were walking on a ‘stark whiteness that seemed to spread out forever’. Underneath their feet w: s a metre-thick ice pack. And below it was 180 metres of living, breathing, salt water. Seals were stretching and lying in the sun on ice.

6. What would happen if Antarctica becomes the warm place that it once used to be? What can be the effect of global warming on it? 

Ans. Before the huge landmass Gondwana broke up into smaller countries, Antarctica used to be a warm place. If it happens then all the icebergs and sheets of ice will start melting. It will raise the levels of the seas and oceans. 

Many low-lying regions of the earth will be submerged under water. The effect of global warming on Antarctica can be disastrous.

7. What was the first emotion of the narrator on facing Antarctica? 

Ans. The first emotion of the narrator on facing Antarctica was that of relief. Actually, he felt relieved to set foot on the Antarctic continent after a long travelling of over 100 hours. It was followed up with an immediate and profound wonder. 

Its vastness and immense white landscape dazzled his eyes. So was its endless blue horizon. Its isolation from the rest of the world created a sense of wonder and mystery.

8. When were India and Antarctica part of the same landmass?

Ans. About six hundred and fifty million years ago a giant amalgamated southern supercontinent existed. It was called Gondwana. There was a time when India and Antarctica were part of the same landmass. It centred roughly around present-day Antarctica. Humans had not arrived on the earth and its climate was much warmer.

9. What was Gondwana? How did it disintegrate? 

Ans. Gondwana was a giant southern supercontinent. It existed about six hundred and fifty million years ago. It centred roughly around present-day Antarctica. Things were quite different then. Humans had not appeared yet. The climate was much warmer. It had a huge variety of flora and fauna. After driving for 500 million years Gondwana was forced to separate due to certain geological phenomena. It broke into separate countries as they exist today, 

10. What are the reasons for increasing the average global temperature or global warming?

Ans. The increase in human population has given birth to innumerable villages, towns, cities and megacities. The burning of fossil fuels has polluted the atmosphere. It has created a blanket of carbon dioxide around the world. It is slowly but surely increasing the average global temperature. Global warming has given birth to many climatic changes.

11. If we want to study and examine the Earth’s past, present and future, Antarctica is the place to go. Discuss reasonably. 

Ans. Antarctica is the place where we can study the past, present and future of the earth. It is the only place in the world, which has never sustained a human population. Therefore, it remains relatively ‘pristine’ in this respect. It also holds in its ice cores half-million-year-old carbon records trapped in its layers of ice. 

Its study will also help in observing climatic changes caused by global warming and the depletion of the ozone layer. 

LONG ANSWER TYPE QUESTIONS

Class 12 English Journey to the end of the Earth Important Questions
Class 12 English

1. Antarctica was part of warm and green Gondwana. How did it become cold and isolated?

Ans. Six hundred and fifty million years ago, there was a giant super-tenant in the south. Now we name it Gondwana. Antarctica formed the central part of that landmass. In those days the climate was warmer and human beings had not appeared. Many species of flora and fauna were there. For 500 million years Gondwana thrived. 

But around the time when dinosaurs disappeared and mammals began to develop, Gondwana began to break up. India broke away and pushed itself against Asia, and buckled its crust to create the Himalayas. South America drifted to join North America opening up that goes around the South Pole. 

On account of this, Antarctica was left not only isolated but it became a frigid Drake Passage. This created a cold current 

2. Describe Tishani’s journey to the end of the earth- Antarctica and desolate too, region and his experiences during that journey. Particularly, highlight the success of the ‘Students on Ice’ programme of Geoff’s Green. 

Ans. The narrator boarded a Russian research ship the ‘Akademik Shokalskiy’. He was heading towards the coldest, driest and windiest continent in the world- Antarctica. His journey began 13.09 degrees north of the Equator from Madras (Chennai). 

He had to cross nine time zones, six checkpoints, three bodies of water and at least three ecospheres. He travelled for over 100 hours. His first emotion was that of relief. 

It was followed up with an immediate and profound wonder. He wondered at its immensity and isolation. 

He also wondered how India and Antarctica formed parts of the same landmass about 650 million years ago. The author was a sun-worshipping South Indian. 

He spent two weeks in a place where 90 per cent of the earth’s total volume is stored. It was devoid of any human markers. There were no trees, no billboards or buildings. He lost all earthly sense of perspective and time. The visual scale ranged from the microscopic to the mighty. He could see from midges and mites to blue whales and icebergs. Days go on and on in 24-hour Austral summer light.

The ‘Students on Ice’ programme by Geoff Green was quite successful. The aim of the programme was to take high school students to the ends of the world. It provided them with inspiring educational opportunities. They could develop a new understanding and respect for their planet. They were ready to absorb, learn and most importantly act. They could realise the: evil effects of global warming. 

The most thrilling experience of the narrator was his walking on the ocean. All 52 of them walked on a vast sheet of whiteness. Underneath their feet was a metre-thick ice pack and underneath that 180 metres of living, breathing, salt water.

3. How do geological phenomena help us to know about the history of humankind? How is Antarctica a part of that human history? 

Ans. Definitely, geological phenomena help us to know about the history of humankind. It is also true that Antarctica is an integral part of that history. Geologists tell us that about six hundred and fifty million years ago, a giant ‘amalgamated’ supercontinent existed in the south. This supercontinent was called Gondwana. At that time India and Antarctica were parts of the same landmass. Gondwana centred around present-day Antarctica. Things were quite different at that time. The man had not appeared on the global scene yet. 

The climate of Gondwana, including that of Antarctica, was much warmer. It had a huge variety of flora and fauna. The supercontinent, Gondwana, survived for about 500 million years. Then the dinosaurs became totally extinct. The age of mammals got underway. Then due to certain geological disturbances, the landmass was forced to separate into countries. These transformed the globe into much as we know it today.

Cent Antarctica is a part of that human history. It is a place where 90 per c of the Earth’s total ice volumes are stored. Here, we can study Cordilleran folds; ozone and carbon; evolution and extinction. It is mind-boggling how India was pushed northwards. South America drifted off to join North America It opened up the Drake Passage to create a cold circumpolar current. The cold current kept Antarctica frigid, desolate and at the bottom of the world.




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FAQs

12. What is the aim of the ‘Students on Ice’ programme?

Ans. The ‘Students on Ice’ programme aims at taking high school students to the ends of the world. It provides them with inspiring educational opportunities. It fosters a new understanding and respect for our planet. It has been in operation for more than six years and is headed by a Canadian national named Geoff Green. The programme has been a great success. 

13. What was Gondwana like? How did it change?

Ans. Gondwana was a supercontinent about 650 million years ago. The climate was warm and there were many species of flora and fauna. There were no human beings. About a million years ago, it disintegrated into separate countries. 

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