Ncert Class 12 English Ch-2 An Elementry School Summary & Question Answers

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If are you a student of class 12th and you are looking for important notes on the subject of English (Ncert Class 12 English Ch-2 An Elementry School Summary & Question Answers) then this website is for you.

This website tells you the question and answers which are very important for the exam and for the last few years it gives you the same questions, by reading these questions you can get very good marks in your exam.

I myself have been a topper of class 12th and I know what type of questions are asked in class 12th exam. At present, I am also playing the role of a teacher, and also make my students practice important information and topics of class 12th. I have written the MCQs article here with my experience of more than 5 years. With the help of this post, you will be able to get very good marks in history from this chapter in the exam.

Ncert Class 12 English Ch-2 An Elementry School Summary & Question Answers

Class12th 
Chapter02
Chapter NameAn Elementry School
BoardCBSE & All Others boards
Book NCERT
SubjectEnglish Elective  (Flamingo)
Medium English
Study Materialspoem Very important question to answer

An Elementry School Summary | An Elementry School’s central idea

Stephen Spender was the poet who visited the Gemini Studios in Bombay. He had leftist leanings and felt deeply for the poor and the downtrodden. He was not against progress and prosperity. 

But he wanted the poor and downtrodden to have equal opportunities to share the benefits. In the poem An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum he draws the attention of society and the government to the dismal condition under which those children live and study.

 There is a map that is deprived of these. He wants that children would be given education in a conclusive atmosphere. Therefore, Stephen Spender deals in this poem with the themes of social injustice and class inequalities.

The school children of slums present a very pathetic picture. They have pale and lifeless faces. Their disorderly hair is torn around and looks like rootless wild plants. They are depressed and keep their heads down. 

Their growth is blocked and they inherit the diseases of their parents. They do have teams. The sweet young boy sitting at the back of his dim classroom dreams of squirrel games and of other interesting places other than his dull and drab classroom.

Neither literature nor the institutions of the civilized world have anything to do with these unfortunate children. The ‘belled and flowery’ world of the rich and the civilized is quite foreign to them. The map of the world is drawn according to the will and whims of powerful persons. 

This world has no relation whatsoever with the world of dirty slums. Their world is confined to narrow streets sealed in with a lead say. Their dirty and stinking world is far, far away from the spacious world of rivers, capes, and stars.

What is the use of literature and Shakespeare for these children reading in slum schools? Nothing. 

The map of the world is meaningless to them. It doesn’t include their narrow lanes and cramped holes in it. The world of the rich and the powerful has so many beautiful things like ships, the sun, and love. They tempt these unfortunate children and they vainly try to steal them. 

Actually, they have to spend their lives in their crowded and cramped holes. These children live on a heap of waste. All their time and space are spent in the foggy slums. These ugly slums are like little hells. They are ugly blots on their maps- the world of the rich and the powerful.

All the governors, teachers, and other responsible persons owe a duty to the school children dwelling in slums. They can’t have their own separate Cosy world. They will have to make their world also the world of the slum children. There are two different and distant worlds. They will have to be abridged. 

Anything that binds and blocks the progress of these slum children will have to be broken. Their world must not be confined to narrow lanes and cramped holes. It must extend and expand to the vast golden coasts of the azure sea. 

They will have to be given complete freedom to express themselves. The pages of books containing the wisdom of ages must be open for them. Only those people create history who have the warmth and strength of the sun in their language.

An Elementry School Summary in Hindi

गंदी बस्तियों के स्कूली बच्चे एक बहुत ही करुणाजनक तस्वीर प्रस्तुत करते हैं। उनके पीछे और निर्जीव चेहरे हैं। उनके बेतरतीब बाल उखड़े पड़े हैं और वे बिना जड़ों के जंगली पौधे के समान दिखाई देते हैं। वे उदास हैं और अपने सिरों को नीचे लटकाए हुए हैं। 

उनका विकास रुका हुआ हैं और वे अपने माता-पिता की बीमारियों को धरोहर के रूप में प्राप्त करते हैं। उनके भी सपने हैं। वह सुन्दर सा युवा लड़का जो उस धुंधली सी कक्षा-कक्ष में पीछे बैठा है। वह गिलहरी के खेल के और उन दूसरी रुचिजनक जगहों के सपने लेता है जो उसके नीरस और लुभाने वाले कक्षा कक्ष से अलग हों।

 न साहित्य और न ही सभ्य समाज की संस्थाओं का इन दुर्भाग्यशाली बच्चों के साथ कोई सम्बंध है। धनी तथा सभ्य व्यक्तियों की घंटियों’ और ‘फूलों’ का संसार उनके लिए बिल्कुल अनजान है। संसार के नक्शे को, अमीर और शक्तिशाली लोगों की इच्छा सनक के अनुसार खींचा गया है। 

उस संसार का गंदी बस्तियों के संसार से कोई भी सम्बंध नहीं है। उन बच्चों का संसार उन तंग गलियों तक सीमित है जिन्हें नीले धूसर आसमान ने घेर रखा है। उनका सड़ता, गंदा संसार नदियों, अन्तरीपों और तारों के संसार से दूर, बहुत दूर

साहित्य और शेक्सपियर का इन गंदी बस्ती के स्कूल में पढ़ने वालों के लिए क्या लाभ कुछ नहीं संसार का नक्शा उनके लिए अर्थहीन है। वह अपने में उनकी तंग गलियों और है ? तंग माँदों को शामिल नहीं करता। अमीरों और शक्तिशाली लोगों के संसार में बहुत सी सुन्दर चीजें हैं जैसे कि जहाज, सूर्य और प्रेम। 

वे इन अभागे बच्चों को प्रलोभित करती हैं और वे व्यर्थ में इनको चुराने का प्रयत्न करते हैं। वास्तव में उन्हें अपना जीवन भीड़ भरे और तंग मांदों में गुजारना है। ये बच्चे कबाड़ के ढेर पर रहते हैं। उनका सारा समय और स्थान इन कोहरेदार गंदी बस्तियों में गुजरता है। ये गंदी बस्तियाँ छोटे नकों के समान हैं। अमीरों और शक्तिशाली लोगों के संसार के नक्शे पर वे भद्दे धब्बे हैं।

सभी गवर्नरों, शिक्षकों और दूसरे जिम्मेदार व्यक्तियों का इन बच्चों के प्रति जो गंदी बस्तियों में रहते हैं एक कर्तव्य है। वे अपना अलग आरामदायक संसार नहीं रख सकते हैं उन्हें अपने संसार को गंदी बस्ती में रहने वाले बच्चों का संसार भी बनाना पड़ेगा। 

दो अलग-अलग और दूर के संसार हैं। उनकी दूरी पाटनी होगी। जो भी बंधन इन गंदी बस्ती में रहनेवाले बच्चों के विकास को रोकता या बाँधता है, वह तोड़ना होगा। उनका संसार केवल तंग गलियों और तंग मांदों तक सीमित नहीं होगा। उनके संसार का नीले समुद्र के सुनहरी समुद्री तट तक विस्तार करना होगा।

 उन्हें जैसा वे चाहते हैं अभिव्यक्ति की पूर्ण स्वतंत्रता देनी होगी। सदियों के ज्ञान को समाहित किये पृष्ठों को उनके लिए खुलनी चाहिए। केवल वे लोग इतिहास रचते हैं जो अपनी भाषा में सूर्य की गर्मी और शक्ति का समावेश करते हैं।

An Elementry School word meaning

  • Custy-sudden blast (झोकेदार, प्रबल) rootless uprooted, without ro (निर्मूल); weeds-wild plants/ grass (जंगली घास फूस); torn-scattered (बिखरे हुए)  r-pale skin (het), stunted-under developed (offesfere); recit-
  • ing-repeating (g); gnarled-knobby (or); dim-with faint light प्रेम प्रकाश वाला); sour cream-colour of sour cream (खट्टी क्रीम के रंग वाली); 
  • donations-gifts presents (FT, 346K); Tyrolese-an Alpine province (34 8137); open handed-generous (r); world-all the good things in the world (HR); sealed in-shut in (, ); lead-a grey colored metal, its grey color (ren, e); capes-point of land running into the sea (39); 
  • wicked-offensive (ref); tempting-allure- game); lives-plural of life (); slyly-secretly (g, g); turn in-to go to bed for night (f); cramped-narrow(); dag-refuge of smelted metal (again for war); peeped- booking secretly (4); spectacles-eye glasses (r); blot-obliterate(them): doom ruin (विनाश, प्रलय); catacombs-underground burial places (कब्रों का तहखाना); azure—sky blue (आकाश जैसा नीला); naked-exposed (खुला)।
class 12th NotesMCQ
HistoryPolitical Science
EnglishHindi

IMPORTANT STANZAS FOR COMPREHENSION | An Elementry School ncert solution 

STANZA 1. 

Read the stanzas given below and answer the questions that follow each: 

Far far from gusty waves these children’s faces. Like rootless weeds, the hair is torn around their pallor. The tall girl with her weighed-down head. The paper-seeming boy, with rat’s eyes.

Answer the following questions:

(a) Where do you think these children are sitting? 

Ans. These children are sitting in the school classroom in a slum that is far far away from the winds or waves blowing strongly.

(b) How do the faces and hair of these children look? 

Ans. The faces of these children look pale. Their uncombed and unkempt hair looks like rootless wild plants.

(c) Why is the head of the tall girl ‘weighed down’?

Ans. The head of the tall girl is weighed down by the burdens of the world. She feels depressed, ill, and exhausted. 

(d) What do you understand by “The paper-seeming boy, with rat eyes”?

Ans. It means that the boy is exceptionally thin, weak, and hungry. 

(e) What do the images of ‘rootless weeds’, ‘pallor’, ‘weighed-down’, ‘paper-seeming’, and ‘rat’s eyes’ suggest?

Ans. (i) ‘Rootless weeds’ suggest disorderliness and haphazard growth.

(ii) ‘Pallor’ indicates the ‘pale and lifeless faces’ suggesting disease and activity. 

(iii) ‘Weighed down’ shows the oppressiveness of the burdens of life. 

(iv) “Paper-seeming indicates thinness like paper and stunted growth. 

(V) Rat’s eyes suggest eyes searching for food.

STANZA.2

…The stunted, unlucky heir Of twisted bones, reciting a father’s gnarled disease, His lesson from his desk. At the back of the dim class.One unnoted, sweet, and young. His eyes live in a dream, Of squirrel’s game, in the tree room, other than this.

Answer the following questions:

(a) Who is the ‘unlucky heir’ and what will he inherit? 

(b) What is the stunted boy reciting?

(c) Who is sitting at the ‘back of the dim class’? 

(d) ‘His eyes live in a dream’–what dream does he have?

(e) Pick two images of despair and disease from these lines. What do they hint at?

Answer

Ans. (a) The lean and thin boy having rat’s eyes and stunted growth is the ‘unlucky heir’. He will inherit twisted bones from his father. 

(b) He is reciting a lesson from his desk. He is enumerating systematically how his father developed the knotty disease. 

(c) A sweet young boy sits at the back of this dim class. He sits there unnoticed. 

(d) The boy seems hopeful. He dreams of better time-outdoor games, of a squirrel’s game, of a room made inside the stem of a tree. He dreams of many things other than this dim and unpleasant classroom such as green fields, and open seas. 

(e) The images of despair and disease in these lines are: ‘the stunted, unlucky heir’, ‘twisted bones’, ‘gnarled disease’, and ‘dim class’. These images hint at the miserable and pathetic life of the children.

STANZA 3. 

On sour cream walls, donations. Shakespeare’s head, Cloudless at dawn, civilized dome riding all cities. Belled, flowery, Tyrolese Valley, Open-handed map Awarding the world its world.

Answer the following questions:

(a) What is the color of the classroom walls? What does this color suggest?

Ans. The color of the classroom walls is ‘sour cream’ or off-white. This color suggests the decaying aspect and pathetic condition of the lives of the children in a slum school.

(b) What do these classroom walls have? 

Ans. The walls of the classroom have pictures of Shakespeare, buildings with domes, world maps, and beautiful valleys. 

(c) Which two worlds does the poet hint at? How is the contrast between the two worlds presented?

Ans. The poet hints at two worlds: the world of poverty, misery, and malnutrition of the slums where children are underfed, weak, and stunted growth. The other world is of progress and prosperity peopled by the rich and the powerful. 

The pictures on the wall suggesting happiness, richness, well-being, and beauty are in stark contrast to the dim and dull slums. 

(d) Explain: (i) ‘Open-handed map’ (ii) ‘Awarding the world its world’

Ans. (1) ‘Open-handed-map’ suggests the map of the world drawn at will by powerful dictators like Hitler. 

(ii) Awarding the world its world suggests how the conquerors and dictators award and divide the world according to their whims. This world is a world of rich and important people. 

(e) Find words from the passage which mean the following:

(i) unpleasant, (ii) institutions of the civilized world/society. 

Ans. (i) sour, (ii) civilized dome.

Stanza 4.

…………..And yet, for these Children, these windows, not this map, their world, Where all their future’s painted with a fog, A narrow street sealed in with a lead sky as far from rivers, capes, and stars of words.

Answer the following questions:

(a) What do ‘these windows’ and ‘this map’ represent? To which of them do the children in the slum school belong? 

Ans. “These windows’ represent the world of the poor slum dwellers with narrow lanes, foggy skies, and dim classrooms. “The map’ represents the world of the rich and the important- the world of civilized domes, bells, flowers, and beautiful valleys.

The children in the slum school belong to a world full of poverty, want, and disease. It is dull, drab, and dark.

(b) What is the future of these children? 

Ans. The future of these children is uncertain and bleak (dark). 

(c) What do these children crave? What do they want to get rid of?

Ans. These children crave openness, rivers, capes, and starry skies. They want to get rid of narrow and crowded streets. 

(d) Find words from the passage which mean the following:

(i) cloudy thick air, (ii) distant.

Ans. (1) fog

(ii) far

Stanza 5

Surely, Shakespeare is wicked, the map a bad example, With ships and sun and love tempting them to steal-For lives that slyly turn in their cramped holes From fog to endless night?

Answer the following questions:

(a) Why is Shakespeare wicked? Why is the map a bad example? 

Ans. Shakespeare and his works are of no use to the children in slum schools. So Shakespeare is not good or noble to them. The map is a bad example because it does not depict their own world of narrow lanes and hovels.

(b) What tempts them and why?

Ans. All beautiful things like ships, the sun, and love tempt these children of slum schools because they don’t have them.

(c) How do they live in their ‘holes’? 

Ans. They live like rats in their cramped little holes. Fog and darkness dominate their lives.

(d) Explain: ‘From fog to endless night’.

Ans. Their future is foggy or uncertain. The only certainty in their lives is the endless night of their death. In other words, their birth, life, and death are all enveloped by darkness.

(e) Find words from the passage that mean:

(i) secretly, (ii) narrow. 

Ans. (i) slyly, (ii) cramped.

Stanza 6.

..On their slag heap, these children Wear skins peeped through by bones and spectacles of steel With mended glass, like bottle bits on stones. All of their time and space are foggy slums.So blot their maps with slums as big as Doom.

Answer the following questions:

(a) What two images are used to describe what these images convey?

Ans. The images used to describe the slums are:

(i) slag heap,

(ii) bottle bits on stones 

(iii) foggy slums

(iv) slums as big as Doom. These images convey the misery of the children and the poverty of their dirty and unhygienic surroundings. 

(b) What sort of life do such children lead?

Ans. In the dirty and unhygienic surroundings, the slum children lead very pathetic and miserable lives full of woes, wants, diseases, poverty, and uncertainty.

(c) What ‘blot’ their maps? Whose maps? 

Ans. These living hells i.e. these dirty slums blot their maps. These are the maps of the civilized world-the world of the rich and great. 

(d) What does the poet convey through ‘So blot their maps with slums. as big as doom?

Ans. The poet conveys his protest against social injustice and class inequalities. He wants the islands of prosperity to be flooded with the dirt and stink of the slums.

(e) Find words from the passage that mean: (i) waste material/lava, (ii) pieces, (Hi) hell/ruin.

Ans. (i) slag, (ii) bits. (iii) doom.

Stanza 7.

Unless, governor, inspector, visitor, This map becomes their window and these windows, That shut upon their lives like catacombs, Break O break open till they break the town  

And show the children green fields, and make their world Run azure on gold sands, and let their tongues Run naked into books the white and green leaves open

History theirs whose language is the sun.

Answer the following questions:

(a) How can ‘this map’ become ‘their window?? 

Ans. This (map of the world) which is shaped and owned by the rich must also be open to the poor and unfortunate children of slums. Only then will it become ‘their window’ and they will be able to peep inside it.

(b) What has shut down their lives like catacombs?

Ans. Their dirty surroundings and unbearable life have blocked their progress and growth. They have been shut inside them like underground graves.

(c) Explain: … till they break the town’.

Ans. Till they come out of the dirty surroundings and slums of the town and come into the open. 

(d) What will happen if the children come out of the bonds that bind them?

Ans. Then their world will be extended to the golden sands and azure waves and to the green fields.

(e) Who created history? 

Ans. They create history whose language has the warmth and power of the sun.

(f) Find words from the passage which mean:

(i) close (ii) underground graves (ii) sky-blue. 

Ans. (i) shut (ii) catacombs (Hi) azure

An Elementry School questions answers 

Very short answer type questions

Class 12 English My Mother at Sixty Six Summary
Class 12 English

1. Tick the item which best answers the following. 

(a) The tall girl with her head weighed down means 

The girl

(i) is ill and exhausted

(ii) has her head bent with shame

(iii) has untidy hair

(b) The paper-seeming boy with rat’s eyes means The boy is

(ii) thin hungry and weak

(i) sly and secretive

(iii) unpleasant looking The stunted, unlucky heir of twisted bones means.

The boy

(i) have an inherited disability

(ii) was short and bony

(d) His eyes live in a dream. A squirrel’s game, in the tree room other than this, means.

The boy is

(1) full of hope for the future 

(ii) mentally ill

(iii) distracted from the lesson

(e) The children’s faces are compared to ‘rootless weeds’

This means they

(i) are insecure 

(ii) are ill-fed

(iii) are wasters

Ans. (a) (i) is ill and exhausted

(b) (ii) thin, hungry, and weak

(c) (i) have an inherited disability

(d) (i) full of hope for the future

(e) (i) Are insecure

2. What do you think is the color of ‘sour cream’?? Why do you think the poet used this expression to describe the classroom walls? 

Ans. The color of ‘sour cream’ is off-white. The poet has used this expression to suggest the decaying aspect. Actually the walls symbolize the pathetic conditions of the lives of these children. However, there is an imped hope in these. 

3. The walls of the classroom are decorated with pictures of ‘Shakespeare’, ‘buildings with domes’, ‘world maps’ and beautiful valleys. How do these contrast with the world of these children?

Ans. These beautifully contrast with the world of these children. These walls decorated with these pictures mean progress, prosperity, and well-being But this is not there in the present conditions of these children. They are underfed, poor, and live in grim poverty. 

4. What does the poet want for the children of the slums? How can their lives be made to change? 

Ans. The poet wants these children to ‘break’ the walls of these slum schools. They should not remain within them but be educated like literary giants. They will then land in a world full of progress and prosperity. There will be no social injustice.

SHORT ANSWER TYPE QUESTIONS

Class 12 English My Mother at Sixty Six Summary
Class 12 English Question Answer

1. Why does Stephen Spender use the images of despair and disease in the first stanza of the poem and with what effect

Ans. He uses the images of despair and disease to describe the miserable and pathetic lives of the children living in slums. The faces of these children are pale and lifeless. They and their hair are like ‘rootless weeds’. The burden of life makes them sit with their heart ‘weighed down’.

The stunted growth is depicted by the paper-seeming boy’ and ‘the stunted unlucky heir of twisted bones. Their weak bodies recite their fathers’ gnarled disease. 

2 What is the message that Stephen Spender wants to give through ‘ An Elementary School Classroom In a Slum’?

Ans. In ‘An Elementary School Classroom In a Slum’ the poet Stephen’s poem Spender deals with the themes of social injustice and class inequalities. There are two different worlds. The world of so-called ‘civilized’ men has nothing to do with the children living in slums.

Nor have the art, culture, and literature any relevance to them. They live in dark, narrow cramped, holes and lanes. Unless the wide gap between the two worlds is abridged there can’t be any real progress or development. The barriers that bind them will have to be broken and they will have to be made mentally and physically free to lead happy lives.

3. Why does Stephen Spender use the images of despair and disease in the first stanza of the poem and with what effect?

Ans. Through the liberal use of similes and metaphors, Stephen Spender uses images of despair and disease in the first stanza. He does so to describe the miserable and pathetic life of the children living in slums. They have been described as ‘the stunted, unlucky heirs of twisted bones’.

 They are like ‘rootless weeds’. Their faces are pale and lifeless. Their weak bodies recite their fathers’ ‘gnarled disease’. The burden of life makes them sit with their heads ‘weighed down’. 

4. This poem was written against the background of the Second World War. But Spender doesn’t describe the lives of generals or heroes but of the poor children of slums. Why and how does he do so?

Ans. The poem has been written against the background of the Second World War. Instead of writing about war heroes and generals, Spender highlights the social injustice and class inequalities of his times. He talks of two worlds. 

Both of them are incompatible. The world of the rich and the ‘civilized’ has nothing to do with the world of narrow lanes and cramped holes. The gap between these two worlds highlights social disparities and inequalities in society.

5. Crushed under poverty, disease, and miseries, do the little school children in slums have any dreams or hopes? What are they?

Ans. The children living in slums have to live in the most miserable and sub-human conditions. The burden of poverty and disease crushes their bodies but not their souls. They still have dreams. Although their future is foggy and uncertain yet they have kept their hopes alive. They dream of open seas, green fields, and the games that a squirrel plays on the trees. 

6. How far do you agree with the statement: “History is theirs whose language is the sun.” 

Ans. This metaphor contains a vital truth. This world does not listen to the ‘dumb and driven’ people. Only those who speak with confidence, power, authority, and vision are heard and obeyed. Those who create history are people whose ideas and language can motivate, move, inspire, and influence millions of people. In order to be effective their language must have the warmth and power of the sun. 

7. The poet says: “And yet, for these children, these windows, not this world, are worlds’. What is the real world for them and which is not for them?

Ans. The conquerors and dictators can change the map of the world. But their ‘map’ and their world is not the world of slum children. That world is inaccessible to them. Their world is the world of stinking slums. 

The narrow lanes and dark cramped holes or houses make up their world. Their world is not the world of ‘domes’,’ Cells’, and ‘flowers’. Their world is a world of poverty and disease. 

8. So blot their maps with slums as big as Doom’. Why does the poet at express such an angry protest? 

Ans. The civilized world has drawn its own map. This world has been separated from the world of slums. The dirty slums with their narrow lanes and cramped houses are nothing less than little hells. 

The poet protests against social injustice and class inequalities. He wants that the islands of prosperity that the rich and the powerful have created should be flooded with the stink and dirt of the slums. Their fair ‘map’ or the world must have blots of slums as big as Doom.

9. What should governors, teachers, inspectors, and other important and powerful persons do to improve a lot of children living in slums?

Ans. The poet feels that the two worlds exist. They are quite opposite and incompatible with each other. He feels the necessity of bridging the gap between them. Governors, teachers, and other important and powerful persons can play an important role in removing social injustice and class inequalities. 

They should break and dismantle all the barriers that bind these children. They must bring them out of their ugly and dirty surroundings. 

Only then will they have their real physical and mental development. All good things in life. the sea, the sun, and the fields should be within easy reach. 

10. The poet says: Who awards the world its world and how? What does this world contain?

Ans. The conquerors and dictators can change the map of the world according to their whims and will. They change the boundaries of various nations and shape the ‘map’. Their fair map is of a beautiful world full of domes, bells and flowers, rivers, capes, and stars.



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